How collaboration helped us improve our graphics products

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Infographics are great. The long, usually vertically oriented, images you see plastered across Twitter and Facebook continue to be one of the most popular content types we offer as a graphics team.

But that wasn't always the case. Essentially, it used to be the only content offering we had.

All change

In early 2014, 95% of our departmental revenue came solely from infographics - so much so that we weren't even called the Graphics Team, but rather the Infographic Team.

However, it was decided by myself and the now departed senior graphic designer Peter Lang that such a staunch reliance on one particular, (potentially faddy) content type was a bad idea. To try to diversify, we decided to offer a number of new products to our clients.

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The graphics team now produces motion graphics

From white papers to web design and magazine covers, we tried our level best to be a full-service graphics agency within a larger content marketing company, but month after month we still generated over 90% of our revenue from infographics.

However, this changed when we altered our view on how our team should work within the context of the wider company.

Collaboration

Instead of seeing ourselves as a separate entity, we decided to work with other teams, such as marketing and editorial, to figure out how we could make their work look better at a low cost.

This sounds like it should have been our priority from the start, but it was only once our company moved towards a more agile and flexible approach that such collaborative opportunities were available to us.

Whereas before we would sit on the end of an email inbox waiting for work to come to us, we started sitting in on strategy meetings and suggesting solutions for clients at an embryonic stage - ensuring we were a big part of their content plan going forward.

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An example of a recent GIF-o-graphic the graphics team produced for Microsoft.

Future

So, with it being clear that the future lies in the breaking down of internal departmental bureaucracy and the improvement of cross-team links, how can we make the next couple of quarters even better?

One way is to create an internal booking system that allows different teams to schedule work in and get a quote within five minutes, thus reducing the chances of projects falling down the back of an administrative sofa.

Whether it allows us to diversify our product offering even further remains to be seen, but at the very least, it will make us more efficient.

Fancy some custom graphics? Get in touch today!